USS Samuel N. Moore DD-747

Action in World War II

The Samuel N. Moore was built by the Bethlehem Steel Company and was commissioned in June of 1944. It had its shakedown cruise off of Bermuda and was sent to Pearl Harbor and the Pacific War zone. It reached the area of Ulithi in November of 1944 and was part of the Fast Carrier Task Force that helped to defend the carriers from enemy aircraft and submarines. The carriers that it guarded launched multiple strikes against the positions of Japan in the Philippines and even into the Japanese home islands. The Samuel N. Moore was damaged in June of 1945 from a typhoon.

Action in the Korean War

After Japan surrendered, the Moore assisted with the occupation forces in the region. It returned to the West Coast from 1947 until 1950. It then headed towards the Western Pacific in May of 1950. With the Communist nation of in Korea starting to show aggression, the Moore headed towards Hong Kong in June. It served off the coast of Korea until February of 1951. It guarded the aircraft carriers and bombarded the enemy shores. The Moore returned to San Diego in June of 1952, but made way to Korea in February of 1953. It was again assigned with carrier escort duty and defended the Yang-do Island. It fought against the shore batteries that were present at the Wonsan Harbor. When the war in Korea ended, the Moore returned to Long Beach. In 1954, it was sent out as an antisubmarine force in the Western Pacific and ended up having this deployment.

Action in the Vietnam War

During the Vietnam War, the Moore provided ammunition to a destroyer after the Gulf of Tonkin incident. It provided fire support off the coast of Vietnam for the troops and patrolled off the coast.  It helped to escort carriers into the Tonkin Gulf. In October of 1969, the Moore was decommissioned and sold for scrap to the Republic of China in 1993.

Asbestos in Navy Ships

Although an essential component of the naval fleet, especially during World War II, naval destroyers also pose a lasting health risk to soldiers serving on them. Unfortunately, products containing asbestos were common, especially on older ships, because of the material’s high resistance to heat and fire. Despite its value as an insulator, asbestos fiber intake can lead to several serious health consequences, including mesothelioma, a devastating cancer without cure. Current and former military personnel who came into contact with these ships should seek immediate medical attention in order to detect possible health consequences associated with asbestos exposure. References: