USS Haddock SSN-621 (1967-1993)

  The Haddock, named after the haddock fish, was the last of the thresher/Permit-class submarines and was the third ship to be named haddock.  She was launched on the 21st of May, 1966 sponsored by Mrs. Thomas G. Morris, the wife of Representative Morris of New Mexico.  She was commissioned on December 22nd 1967 with Commander Stanley J. Anderson in command. She was initially ported in San Diego, California, but after a deployment to the Western Pacific she was home ported to Pearl Harbor for her first overhaul finished in 1972. For her next deployment she ended up being awarded the Meritorious Unit Commendation for significant achievements. In 1977 the USS Haddock had an overhaul in Mare Island that lasted 19 months.  After which she returned to San Diego and Submarine Squadron Three. In December of 1983 she completed her seventh deployment to the Western Pacific and went on to Mare Island in October of 1984 for her third overhaul. Upon returning to San Diego in February of 1987 she earned the Battle Efficiency “E” Award for fiscal year 1988. Three years later she deployed for the eleventh time to the Western Pacific and then in 1993 she was decommissioned and struck from the Naval Vessel Register. She entered the Nuclear Powered Ship and Submarine Recycling Program on October 1, 2000 which was completed a year later on October 1, 2001.

Asbestos and Navy  Ships

Although an essential component of the naval fleet, especially throughout conflicts of the last century, submarines also pose a lasting health risk to soldiers serving on them. However, these risks extend beyond the inherent dangers that existed while operating the vessels during military conflicts. Unfortunately, products containing asbestos were also common aboard submarines because of the material’s high resistance to heat and fire. Despite its value as an insulator, asbestos fiber intake can lead to several serious health consequences, including mesothelioma, a devastating cancer without cure. Furthermore, the enclosed environment of submarines put servicemen at an even higher risk of exposure. Current and former military personnel who came into contact with or served on submarines should seek immediate medical attention in order to detect possible health consequences associated with asbestos exposure. Reference: