USS Elliot DD-146

The USS Elliot was a Wickes-class destroyer built in Philadelphia and commissioned in January of 1919. It was deployed to the Eastern Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea in April to June of 1919. In July it went through the Panama Canal on its way to joining the Pacific Fleet. In March of 1920 it left the West Coast of the United States for the Western Pacific. It was in the Asiatic Fleet for the next year and a half and operated mainly in the Philippine and Chinese waters. It made a trip up the Yangtze River in June of 1920 before it was sent back to San Diego, California in May of 1922 and was decommissioned only a few months after its return from the Far East. The Elliot returned to service in February of 1930 and was stationed in the Pacific, taking part in Fleet maneuvers in the Atlantic and Caribbean in 1934. The following year it was used for experimental and training duties. It was converted into a minesweeper in 1940 and was re-designated DMS-4. The Elliot was sent to the Aleutians in July of 1942 and took part in the bombing of Kiska in August. It swept mines in May of 1943, clearing the way for the invasion of Attu. It was employed as an escort while it was in Alaska. It finally returned to warmer waters in June of 1943 and towed targets for the rest of its career. It was re-designated AG-104 and eventually was decommissioned and placed in reserve in July of 1945. It was sold for scrapping in January of 1946.

Asbestos in Navy Ships

Although an essential component of the naval fleet, especially during World War II, naval destroyers also pose a lasting health risk to soldiers serving on them. Unfortunately, products containing asbestos were common, especially on older ships, because of the material’s high resistance to heat and fire. Despite its value as an insulator, asbestos fiber intake can lead to several serious health consequences, including mesothelioma, a devastating cancer without cure. Current and former military personnel who came into contact with these ships should seek immediate medical attention in order to detect possible health consequences associated with asbestos exposure. References: