Marina Managers

Often responsible for many of the operational aspects of a marina, this field may also involve administrative duties and port oversight. Marina managers are frequently required to act as the liaison between their local Port Administration and tenants. This career generally involves all important aspects of boat and boathouse management as well, including scheduling, leasing and payment transactions. Employees of marinas must possess good communication skills, as well as the ability to promote their facility in a competitive field. Furthermore, marina managers might also be called on to organize special events, maintain records, answer and draft marina correspondence and provide support to the entire staff. In addition, marina managers, and general employees, must possess a working knowledge of ships and standard marina practice. As designated professionals in the maritime industry, guests to a marina may expect employees to possess any supplemental knowledge that ensures the proper function of a marine vessel or facility.

Marina Managers and Asbestos

In addition to the inherent occupational hazards of working at a marina, employees also risk exposure to asbestos, based on the material’s frequent use in ships. Because fire poses such a significant threat onboard ships, highly fire-retardant materials are used in their construction. Unfortunately, asbestos was used heavily on ships for just this purpose because it was an effective insulator against fire. As the material is damaged, it breaks down into small particles that can be swallowed or inhaled, leading to the development of mesothelioma. Furthermore, ship cabins, which are enclosed with limited air circulation, might accumulate great quantities of these particles as the ship ages, silently infecting victims whenever they enter these areas. In addition, sea travel places a tremendous amount of stress on a vessel, both from the deterioration brought on by the harsh climate and constant battering ships receive on the sea. These two factors accelerate the deterioration of a vessel, leading to the increased exposure of these dangerous materials. Unfortunately, asbestos exposure can also occur secondhand, meaning individuals who encounter these materials on their boats can bring them into the marina facilities where employees can be exposed. As more visitors exposed to this toxin enter a facility, worker hazard increases as the fibers leave those initially exposed and settle in the offices and various buildings throughout the marina. Furthermore, older marina buildings, exposed to a harsh climate that accelerates facility deterioration, might also possess asbestos materials because it was a popular form of insulation in general construction as well. For marina managers, who might have spent many years working in these toxic environments, asbestos exposure remains a significant threat because the chances of developing mesothelioma increase with frequent exposure.