Auto Mechanics

Ever since the introduction of cars within the United States, auto mechanics have been employed as a means to care for the vehicles. The majority of Americans require cars for their daily life and, therefore, auto mechanics are a required asset for the country. For the majority of auto mechanics, working with vehicles is a part of their life and their passion. For several decades, numerous mechanics for automobiles have been exposed to toxic asbestos fibers which were present in the clutches and brakes of the vehicles. Regardless of the fact that asbestos is not currently used in the manufacturing of clutches and brakes in the United States, auto mechanics may still find themselves exposed to the substance during their work with older vehicles or their work with auto parts that may have been manufactured in another country where asbestos is still permitted. One of the reasons that exposure to asbestos is so likely among auto repair personnel is that they rarely work in well ventilated areas. Because of this, it is likely that they will inhale large amounts of concentrated asbestos fibers which could be incredibly detrimental to their health.

Asbestos and Auto Mechanics

Although the wearing of protective gear may help in the control of asbestos exposure, auto mechanics have spent decades working on vehicles without being aware of the dangers that are linked with asbestos inhalation. Therefore, numerous individuals have worked with the material without using any form of protection whatsoever. And, because of its high-quality insulating properties, asbestos was very widely used. Those auto mechanics who have worked for large manufacturers or automobiles and auto parts have also been subject to cover-ups in regard to that dangerous material. Records have shown that managers and owners of companies have known for years of the dangers associated with asbestos but concealed these facts from the employees and neglected to provide them with protective gear. Several decades have passed and these individuals have begun to be diagnosed with serious conditions related to asbestos exposure, such as mesothelioma. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency offers individuals the opportunity to learn more about asbestos as well as its hazardous effects on the health of the body. The Agency also provides information regarding protection against asbestos and how to seek treatment and advice if you believe that you have been subjected to asbestos exposure and/or might be experiencing symptoms of diseases related to the material.