USS Tinosa SSN-606 (1964-1992)

USS Tinosa was a Permit-class submarine, which is a class of nuclear-powered fast attack submarines that were in service with the U.S. Navy from the 1960s through 1994. Tinosa was commissioned on October 17, 1964 with Commander Robert B. Brumsted in command.

Service

Through the first three months of 1968, Tinosa provided services for the Naval Underwater Sound Laboratory at New London, Connecticut. During a major overhaul in spring of 1969 Tinosa received the SUBSAFE submarine safety improvements. These new regulations and conversions were designed in the wake of the tragic loss of USS Thresher SSN-593. After deploying to the Mediterranean Sea with the Sixth Fleet, Tinosa returned home to conduct tests in conjunction with a project sponsored by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

The ship underwent another major overhaul at the Ingalls Shipbuilding Yard, located at Pascagoula, Mississippi, from late 1975 to December 1977. Afterward, Tinosa resumed her operations with the Atlantic Fleet which included two months of weapons system testing in the Caribbean, followed by a combined exercise with units of the Royal Canadian Navy. Among her other activities with global naval forces were her operations with a NATO task force composed of U.S., British, Italian, and Turkish naval units.

Decommissioning

Tinosa was deactivated despite still being in commission on July 15, 1991. She was later decommissioned and struck from the Naval Vessel Register exactly one year from the time she was deactivated. Tinosa’s holk was recycled as part of the Nuclear-Powered Ship and Submarine Program located in Bremerton, Washington.

Asbestos in Navy Ships

Although an essential component of the naval fleet, especially throughout conflicts of the last century, submarines also pose a lasting health risk to soldiers serving on them. However, these risks extend beyond the inherent dangers that existed while operating the vessels during military conflicts. Unfortunately, products containing asbestos were also common aboard submarines because of the material’s high resistance to heat and fire. Despite its value as an insulator, asbestos fiber intake can lead to several serious health consequences, including mesothelioma, a devastating cancer without cure. Furthermore, the enclosed environment of submarines put servicemen at an even higher risk of exposure. Current and former military personnel who came into contact with or served on submarines should seek immediate medical attention in order to detect possible health consequences associated with asbestos exposure.

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