USS Dayton CL-105 (1945-1962)

The USS Dayton CL-105 was built in Camden, New Jersey. The ship was classified a Cleveland light cruiser which weighed in at 10,000 tons. In the very beginning of January 1945 the USS Dayton ship was commissioned.

Action in World War II

In the month of June in 1945 she had entered into the Western Pacific ocean just in time to join in with the many other ships on the carrier airstrikes and the surface gunfire against the Japanese Islands. In the middle of August the Dayton spent most of its time in the Far East supporting the occupation efforts after Japan’s capitulation. In November of 1945 she spent most of her time on the West Coast of the United States, departing once again for Japan in January of 1946. Before she had a chance to get back to Japan she was sent to join the Atlantic Fleet for training at Guantanamo Bay. This is where she spent much of the remainder of her active duty, save for a 1947 tour of the Mediterranean. She received one battle star for her war service.

After the War

The USS Dayton was sent out to the Mediterranean Sea in February through June of 1948 where she served as a flagship. In March of 1949 the USS Dayton was decommissioned while she was residing in Boston, Massachusetts. After her decommission, she then moved onto be part of the Reserve Fleet which was stationed at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where she rested for the next twelve years. The USS Dayton was then taken off of the Naval Vessel Register in September of 1961. In April of 1962 the USS Dayton had come to the end of the line and was sold for scrap meta,l which was the final ending to her long career.

Asbestos in Navy Ships

Although an essential component of the naval fleet, even today, naval cruisers also pose a lasting health risk to soldiers serving on them. Unfortunately, products containing asbestos were common, especially on older ships, because of the material’s high resistance to heat and fire. Despite its value as an insulator, asbestos fiber intake can lead to several serious health consequences, including mesothelioma, a devastating cancer without cure. Current and former military personnel who came into contact with these ships should seek immediate medical attention in order to detect possible health consequences associated with asbestos exposure. References: