USS Crane DD 109 (1919-1946)

The USS Crane was a 1,060 ton Little-class destroyer built in 1919 in San Francisco, California. Its commission began in April of 1919 and it was sent to the Atlantic. It made its maiden voyage to England and France and returned in July of 1919. It was returned to San Francisco where it remained, patrolling the Pacific coast. Its duties were to take part in fleet maneuvers. The USS Crane was kept as a stand by destroyer. After only 3 years of actual destroyer maneuvers, it was decommissioned and stored in San Diego, California. From June of 1922 and for 17 years thereafter, it stayed in San Diego, California.

Action in World War II

The start of World War II brought the USS Crane back into naval use. The Navy re-commissioned The USS Crane in December of 1939 and sent it on active duty as part of the Neutrality Patrol. It was also used for training activities as part of the Patrol. It remained as a training navy vessel until the United States declared war on Germany and Japan and entered the war as part of the Allied Forces. The USS Crane stayed in the Pacific coast and took part in escorting ships as well as patrolling the Pacific coast for enemies. Its main duty was to train other Navy destroyers used for patrolling and battle missions.

After the war

In April of 1944, the USS Crane became a part of the West Coast Sound Training School. In April of 1945, the destroyer left California, ordered to Philadelphia after the surrender of Japan in 1945. It stayed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, for a year and was again relieved of its Navy commission in November of 1946. The USS Crane was junked and sold that year.

Asbestos in Navy Ships

Although an essential component of the naval fleet, especially during World War II, naval destroyers also pose a lasting health risk to soldiers serving on them. Unfortunately, products containing asbestos were common, especially on older ships, because of the material’s high resistance to heat and fire. Despite its value as an insulator, asbestos fiber intake can lead to several serious health consequences, including mesothelioma, a devastating cancer without cure. Current and former military personnel who came into contact with these ships should seek immediate medical attention in order to detect possible health consequences associated with asbestos exposure. References: