USS Bush DD-529 (1943-1945)

The USS Bush was launched on October 27, 1942. It was built by Bethlehem Steel Company out of San Francisco California. Its launch was sponsored by Miss Marion Jackson, the great grand niece of its namesake, Lieutenant Bush. The official commission of the USS Bush took place on May 10, 1943. Commander W.F. Peterson was appointed commander of the Bush.

Action in World War II

One of the USS Bush's first missions was as a patrol and escort vessel in Alaskan waters. After this, the Bush arrived in the Pacific at Pearl Harbor on December 4, 1943. Its role there was as a patrol, escort and fire ship. Its primary routes were from the Ellice Islands to New Guinea, the Philippines, and Okinawa. The USS Bush was assigned to a number of duty assignments throughout its career. From December 26, 1943 to March 31, 1944, it was actively part of the Bismarck Archipelago Operations. Among these operations were the Cape Gloucester, New Britain landings and the Admiralty Islands landings. The Bush was also involved in the Saidor, New Guinea Operations on January 18 to 21, the Morotai landing on September 15, and the Leyte landings on October 20 to 24. The Bush also took part in the Luzon Operation. This operation included the Mindoro and Lingayen Gulf Landings on December 12 to 18, 1944 and on January 4 to 18, 1945. The Iwo Jima Operation took place from February 19 to March 9. The Bush also participated in the Okinawa Operation on April 1 to 6. The first hit the USS Bush took was on November1, 1944. It was performing its duties in the Leyte Gulf when it was attacked by 10 Japanese planes. Two were wounded. The Japanese finally sunk the USS Bush on April 6, 1945 off of Okinawa, losing nearly a third of its crew. Asbestos in Navy Ships Although an essential component of the naval fleet, especially during World War II, naval destroyers also pose a lasting health risk to soldiers serving on them. Unfortunately, products containing asbestos were common, especially on older ships, because of the material’s high resistance to heat and fire. Despite its value as an insulator, asbestos fiber intake can lead to several serious health consequences, including mesothelioma, a devastating cancer without cure. Current and former military personnel who came into contact with these ships should seek immediate medical attention in order to detect possible health consequences associated with asbestos exposure. References:
Naval Historical Center